Qalys Health Economics

Health economics consulting

Qalys is a health economics consulting company specialized in healthcare and sexual and reproductive health (SRH) in the low- and middle-income countries. Qalys was founded by Dr Jari Kempers, health economist PhD, in 2007.

Sexual and reproductive health specialist

Economics aspects of SRH programmes are a speciality of the company. This expertise includes a long track record of health economics consulting projects on family planning, contraceptive, youth-friendly SRH services and school-based sexuality education programmes.

Who we help?

Our clients included many of the key players in international healthcare development and SRH sectors. We have successfully carried out projects for UNFPA, WHO, Swiss TPH, SDC, EU, UNICEF, UNESCO and ILO. Moreover, we have provided technical support to a large number of Ministries of Health and national health insurance funds.

Where do we work?

We have provided health economic strategic advice and technical support in more than 25 countries across the world, in Europe, Asia and Africa. In East Europe, Central Asia, and in the former Soviet Union countries, we have carried out health economics projects in Moldova, Albania, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and Kazakstan. In Asia, we provided technical support to programmes in India, Indonesia, the Philippines, Papua New Guinea and Timor-Leste. And in Africa, we have worked in Kenya, Uganda, Malawi, South Africa, Lesotho, Nigeria and Sierra Leone.

What do we do?

We provide healthcare decision-makers with strategic health economics advice. Technically, our work typically includes costings, cost-effectiveness analyses, cost-benefit analyses and budget impact analyses. We support healthcare planning by conduction scale-up forecasts for the implementation of healthcare programmes. Moreover, we develop and use health economics models to provide new information and insight into healthcare policymaking.

We help organizations to demonstrate the costs and benefits of their programmes. These can be then used to attract national funding and international support. We frequently assistant healthcare programmes in their efforts to include their services in the national health insurance benefit packages, by assessing the actual costs of their services and highlighting the potential costs savings created by the services.

Financially, we often participate in funding and programme proposals. It seems that having health economics programme components and specialists in the proposals increases the chances of receiving funding.